Along the Grapevine

Quiche in Wild Grape Leaf Shells

23 Comments

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I hope I’m wrong, but I suspect there won’t be many wild grapes along the grapevine this year thanks probably to a frost in late May. On the bright side, the leaves are doing fine and at their best for picking now and for the next couple of weeks.

As I have described in past posts at this time of year, the leaves can be preserved easily by freezing after blanching lightly. For a change I decided to use fresh leaves for this recipe, but frozen or preserved in brine, which is how they are usually sold in markets, would work just as well.

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So for Fiesta Friday #72 I wanted to share some of my delectable harvest in the form of a shell for quiche. The custard is a very simple cream, egg and vegetable mixture. You can choose from any type of seasonal vegetable, but I decided to roast the vegetable first. If you have milkweed flowers available, they make a perfect pairing with the flavour of grape leaves, and can usually be harvested in roughly the same place at the same time. However, asparagus would be a fine alternative, and if you live in a part of the world where neither is available, any vegetable will do. But if you are picking milkweed, please bear in mind – given that most milkweed plants have six flowers, you should leave at least three on any given plant so that it will bloom and feed the pollinators, notably monarch butterflies. They should be picked before they open, while they are still green or just beginning to develop a rosy hue.

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To make these quiches which I baked in muffin tins, first snip off any stem from the base, then brush the bottom side – the side where you can see the veins – with olive oil. Place them in the pans, bottom side up and slightly overlapping. In muffin tins I used two large leaves or three small ones.

Brush the vegetables with oil and roast until tender. For the custard, mix thoroughly 2 eggs, 1/2 cup milk, 1/2 cup cream, 1/4 cup grated cheese (I used feta). Stir in about 1/2 cup roasted vegetables chopped.

Fill the leaves with the mixture and bake for about 30 minutes at 350 degrees F.

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The leaf ‘pastry’ will be brown and crispy. The flavour of the grape leaf is what makes these little quiches so special.

Related Posts:

Devilled Eggs with Milkweed Flowers;  Milkweed Bud Fetuccine;  Milkweed Flowers and Lambsquarters Soup;

Grape Leaves with Roasted Vegetables;  Pickerel in Grape Leaves with Mushroom Za’atar Sauce;  Grape Leaf. Herb and Yogurt Pie;  Vegetarian Dolmas;  Dolmas with Meat.

Author: Hilda

I am a backyard forager who likes to share recipes using the wild edibles of our area.

23 thoughts on “Quiche in Wild Grape Leaf Shells

  1. Mmmm! I bet this is so delicious Hilda! Have a wonderful weekend!😀

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  2. Wow…great minds think alike. I haven’t done this, but speculated on cooking quiche or frittata in grape leaves in my mini muffin tin. I like that you’ve successfully pulled it off. Bet they were good.

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    • Thanks Debi. I was inspired by the yogurt and herb pie which I made last year. I expect this could be done in a larger pie form too, but with more leaves.

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  3. Great idea! Just need to locate some vine leaves so I can give this a try🙂

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  4. Lovely post! I did not know you could use the leaves of wild grapes and buds of milk weed in cooking! I really thought milk weeds were exclusively for butterflies. i guess, it is time to grow it in my backyard so monarchs can stop for a quick drink and I can enjoy some buds too!

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  5. I love your leafy quiches! My neighbor has grapevines growing like mad and I think I’ll go for a visit and gather some! Great post!

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  6. What a wonderful idea using the grape leaves as a pastry shell, love it! Thanks for sharing:)

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  7. Ohh this is so clever Hilda! Totally loved it!

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  8. Brilliant! Just brilliant!

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  9. What a clever idea. I never would of thought of using grape leaves that way. Thanks for sharing with Fiesta Friday #72. Have a great week.

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  10. I love it!!! I hate buying grape leaves (so far I’ve only ventured into traditional dolmades) but this renews me with vigor to seek out homegrown leaves. Thanks, Hilda!

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  11. Me encantan las quiches y esta con hojas de parra es original y parece deliciosa. Nunca he probado las hojas de parra y creo que intentaré buscarlas para probarlas próximamente.
    Saludos.

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  12. Pingback: Fermented Wild Grape Leaves | Along the Grapevine

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