Along the Grapevine

Maple Walnut Cookies for Fiesta Friday #10

90 Comments

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This week I have the honour of co-hosting  the Novice Gardener’s 10th Fiesta Friday  along with Julianna of Foodie On Board. This means that I will be an official rep of the party and will mingle with all the guests. For those of you who are not familiar with this weekly event, it is an opportunity for bloggers to come together at a virtual party and bring their recipes, crafts or fun ideas to share with each other. In the ten weeks since it began, I have made new friends in the blogging world, discovered some great ideas and recipes, and  just generally enjoyed the up-beat atmosphere of this get-together. For those of you who are blogging and have not yet participated, you are cordially invited to join in the fun. Besides meeting a dynamic group of bloggers, you will benefit from a considerable increase in exposure and number of views, something every blogger can appreciate. The guidelines here will explain how easy it is to participate. My thanks to Angie, The Novice Gardener, for her inimitable hospitality. Pay her a visit and you’ll see what I mean.

For this Fiesta Friday, I bring recipes with my own home-made, home-grown maple syrup. I have just boiled down our fourth batch of maple syrup from our two sugar maple trees in the front garden. Who knew that all this delicious sweetness was there just for the taking? Each batch takes about two hours of cooking on our propane burner outdoors, and another hour or so on a gentle heat indoors to get it to the right heat (219 degrees F. if you have a thermometer). I’m not using a thermometer, and just guessing when it is ready, but so far the batches have been quite consistent.

Each batch gets a little darker, and eventually the sap will begin to be coloured when it runs, which means it’s time to stop. That will be a bit of a relief in itself – there will be other things to forage by then. Meanwhile, I have a good supply of syrup to do some experimenting in the kitchen, and this week  I came up with a couple of cookie recipes.

The first was inspired by a recipe for walnut cookies I made last week from Fae’s Twist and Tango’s Naw Ruz roundup. With the extra liquid from the syrup, I had to add some sort of flour, so chose buckwheat because I love the flavour and texture of it when baking.

Maple Walnut Cookies

4 egg yolks

3/4 cup maple syrup

2 cups ground walnuts

1 cup buckwheat flour

Beat the egg yolks in a bowl. Add the maple syrup, walnuts and flour and stir to combine. Spoon onto a baking sheet, press down flat with the back of a wet spoon and decorate with walnut pieces. Bake at 350 F for about 20 minutes.

These are chewy, and not very sweet, although sweet enough that the taste of maple comes through.

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Then I had four egg whites to use, so I went for a sort of macaron style cookie, which I wanted to sweeten with a maple walnut marzipan filling. I made the recipe from Buckwheat for your health which was the inspiration for this dish for New Year, and as a macaroon, it turned out beautifully following the recipe to the letter. However this time, with 4 egg whites, I had to do some difficult math. The result was not as elegant as the original recipe, but am posting it anyway, because it was considered a delicious cookie even if it was not exactly as I intended. And you can always follow the original recipe if you want something more resembling a macaron. I was particularly pleased with the filling, and will no doubt find many more ways to incorporate it into desserts and baking.

Maple Walnut Sandwich 

4 egg whites

1 cup buckwheat flour

1 cup icing sugar

Beat the egg whites until stiff. Combine the flour and sugar. Gently fold in the egg whites. Spoon onto a baking sheet, and flatten with the back of a wet spoon, as this batter does not spread out much.

Bake at 300 F for 10 minutes. When cool, sandwich two together with some maple walnut marzipan between them.

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To make the marzipan, simply grind some walnuts very fine in a food processor, until at least part of them becomes pasty. Add maple syrup while still processing until you reach the consistency of thick honey. How much syrup you add will depend on how sweet and how soft you want it. However you do it, it is delicious. I think even better than fresh home-made marzipan.

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Author: Hilda

I am a backyard forager who likes to share recipes using the wild edibles of our area.

90 thoughts on “Maple Walnut Cookies for Fiesta Friday #10

  1. Hilda! You amaze me. In my fantasy life, I would be you, tapping maple syrup from my trees and concocting fabulous recipes – but you are really doing it! I wish I were your neighbour and I could just pop over and watch you do all of this and learn from you first hand! Oh, and by the way – you deserve a double cocktail after all of your hard work. Oh…Angie brought her Latin Lover to the party – the drink of course. If you would like a change from the Maple Syrup cocktail, I am on bar duty…

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    • Thanks Julianna. And don’t mind if I do accept that offer of Angie’s cocktail – just a small one to begin with. After all, the party has just begun. Looking forward to meeting all the guests!

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  2. I bet these cookies are FABULOUS! Thanks for co-hosting!! Happy Fiesta Friday!🙂

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  3. Pingback: Fiesta Friday #10 | The Novice Gardener

  4. These cookies sound incredible! Of course, maple syrup can make just about anything incredible…!

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  5. Your cookies look fantastic Hilda! I imagine the taste must reach the level of perfection using your freshly tapped syrup. My dad tapped the trees on his property years ago and I know the process is a labor of love. So much sap to acquire the liquid gold of syrup, yet so worth it! Thanks for bringing such a delicious offering to party…and thanks for co-hosting with Julianna too🙂

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    • And thanks for visiting and the comments. We are only doing a small amount, so the work is not that much – probably the biggest challenge for producing a small quantity is the amount of fuel needed. But as you say, it is a labour of love, and worth every cent for our own ‘free’ syrup.

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  6. that is a lovely creation! and with home-made syrup. Yes, truly a labor of love.

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  7. It must be particularly rewarding to be able to use home grown ingredients for your cooking! Great, and so are the cookies!

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  8. Oh wow! I love walnuts! What a wonderful combination Hilda!

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  9. Thanks for co-hosting! Your freshly tapped maple syrup and goodies look & sound scrumptious!

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  10. wow, what a simple and easy recipe, jyummmmm

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    • Thanks. I do seem to go for simplicity of ingredients these days – as long as they are good quality, it works well for me. Simple and local, the food that is!

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  11. Hi Hilda, these cookies look delicious! I’m really impressed you made your own maple syrup, especially since I can’t even find decent maple syrup at my local grocer’s when I need it. What a treat! Cocktails and cookies–great party so far!

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    • I lived many years outside Canada, discovered all sorts of wonderful ingredients, recipes and food customs, but had to live without this Canadian staple. Now I am making up for lost time, and able to comfort myself while I miss so many of the things I learned to love overseas.

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  12. What fun to make your own maple syrup and then use it in recipes🙂

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    • It has been fun. And happily not as much work as I thought it would be. We have been taking two or three days between batches because it has taken that long to fill our pot – so that has made it easier.

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  13. I’m amazed to know that you made your own maple syrup.Very simple, interesting and healthy recipe with buck wheat flour.Thanks for sharing my dear.Happy that I had a chance to meet you virtually.

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  14. Oh Hilda, what a delightful co-host you are! I’m also thrilled that Angie has introduced me to your blog xx

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    • Thank you, Melissa. That is the beauty of Angie’s parties – meeting so many talented bloggers out there. Glad to meet you too, and am in awe of your beautiful house.

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  15. Homemade maple syrup! You are amazing & so are these cookies!

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  16. You are so lucky you have a maple tree. I love maple syrup but its just too expensive here x

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    • We are lucky, because I love maple syrup. But then again, every region has its own specialty, and I am learning more and more the importance of appreciating what we have in our own ‘backyard’. Perhaps that’s why I took up foraging.

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      • yes I love foraging too, only just discovered it last year, I picked blackberries, apples, rosehips, hawthorne and elderberry…but it is time consuming LOL and back breaking

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      • Time consuming, yes. But so is gardening. And I don’t have to weed! There are some things that are efficient time-wise, like sumac, and some of the bigger leafy greens. And when you consider how much more nutritious they are than cultivated plants, you just need to add a little to your normal fare. But it sounds as if you already know the advantages.

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  17. Oh Hilda, please pass the sandwich cookies! They look so good. And that homemade maple syrup? I’d buy bottles of them from you!

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  18. Thanks Patty. If you were here, I would gladly give you one for being so kind.

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  19. I love maple – and in a cookie sounds divine!

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  20. Home made maple syrup???? WOWSERS!! that’s really very cool indeed!

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  21. Marvelous! Fae @ Singapore 😀

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  22. Wow. I saw the pot cooking and had visions of crab cooking or turkey frying but never would have guessed maple syrup making. Impressive. The cookies look/sound amazing. It is so odd to see snow when we are finally seeing grass. Thanks for hosting with the lovely Julianna and Angie.

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  23. We just drizzled maple syrup on our oat cakes this morning and was thinking how it really is liquid gold. So expensive and so wonderful. And here you are tapping your own trees and making it yourself! How wonderful Hilda. What an interesting process (I saw that episode of Curious George… 🙂 )

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  24. It is pretty neat stuff. There are so many sugar maples around here – I am going to offer to tap my friends’ trees next year, but will make do with our minuscule grove. It is serving us quite well.

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  25. Well, that’s pretty incredible – your own home made maple syrup! It is the one thing that I really missed when I moved from Winnipeg to London and always bring back lots of it when I visit my mum. Those cookies look divine Hilda. Thanks for co-hositing Fiesta Friday, I am looking forward to trying one of your cocktails!!

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    • I’m sure the customs people can recognize a Canadian from a mile away, with bags of maple syrup. I have heard some real horror stories of broken jars in transit. I recommend you buy the tins!

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      • I hadn’t thought of that – expats packing bottles of maple syrup through customs!! Having had a bottle of conditioner leak I now seal the tops with tape and wrap in bubble before packing!

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  26. Such lovely recipes. I’m delighted to hear about using buckwheat flour as an alternative to almonds in macarons.
    I think your nut paste would make pretty nice fruits, like marzipan fruits, if you think I could make it thick enough? I’ve not found any wild-growing sugar maples here yet, so it would be expensive.
    when I get back from my travels, I’ll have to start joining fiesta friday, too. You guys look like you have a lot of fun

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    • Thanks. Yes, I was thinking if I were good at sculpting, I would make little somethings out of the paste as done with marzipan, but mine would look awful. And by all means, do join the Fiesta Friday crowd – I always learn so much from the other guests.

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  27. Good to meet you Hilda🙂. Thanks for being such a gracious host. I am really amazed that you make your own maple syrup…wow… Also, loved both our recipes. I would be trying them soon with oats flour. Thanks for sharing🙂.
    Cheers,
    Sonal

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  28. those cookies look absolutely incredible and easy too! It’s so impressive that you make you own maple syrup- super. could we have some jars of the maple syrup please?😉

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  29. I was already jealous when I saw you tapping maple syrup. Now you have turned it into fabulous cookies I am green with envy🙂 Fabulous recipe!

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  30. That pot looks like one I might use to make broth for noodles. I think I will take seconds of the maple walnut sandwich. I think the homemade marzipan is fantastic.

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  31. Hilda, fantastic recipes, once again. I’ll give them a try, especially the walnut marzipan. Probably great even on toasts!

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  32. Thanks Noony. Help yourself. There’s lots more where that came from. Can’t believe those two trees have been, or rather are being, so prolific in sap.

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  33. Hilda…I’m so impressed with this… AMAZED really. I mean… who taps their maples and makes their own maple syrup, so that they can bake cookies to share on Fiesta Friday?!! Lol.. I LOVE this. The cookies look absolutely delicious. I’m a maple walnut nut. I love it. Wonderful post. Awesome photos. Lovely recipe!🙂

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  34. Thanks so much for your kind comments. I’m glad someone else understands that maple and walnuts are a natural pairing. I have thought of tapping maple trees for many years, but never quite got around to it. I think that is probably true of most Canadians. But then they don’t all have Fiesta Friday as an incentive.

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  35. I love how you always use your home grown /produced stuff to come up with delicious recipes. These maple walnut cookies seem absolutely delicious. I love this combination – I remember one time a few years ago when I was pregnant with my daughter, I was so addicted to a particular brand of Maple walnut ice cream(can’t remember which one now! )..so I absolutely love this combination and the marzipan sounds even more delectable. Will have to try it sometime definitely!🙂

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  36. Thanks. I am learning that I am not the only fan of maple and walnut.

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  37. I’m still amazed that you made your own maple syrup, so idyllic. Real maple syrup costs something like $10 for a small bottle here, so the sight of your outdoor syrup boiling gave me real maple envy. Your cookies look pretty scrumptious too, bet it tasted better knowing that you have home made maple syrup for an ingredient. And, thanks for co-hosting this week’s Fiesta!!🙂

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  38. I love biscuits! Unfortunately, maple syrup is not easily found around here, do you think treacle would work? Or maybe glucose? Love the idea of walnut marzipan🙂

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    • Hi. I think if you don’t have maple syrup, honey would be a better substitute than treacle, which is a very strong flavour. Or honey and treacle mixed or agave. Hope this helps.

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  39. Hilda this is fantastic! I’m especially impressed by that delectable looking maple marzipan! What a brilliant idea! I’m allergic to nuts myself, but will look on and enjoy the ooo’s and ahh’s of the other guests enjoying them. And there certainly seem to be many! How did you first realize that you could tap the trees in your yard to make syrup? Do you think it was worth all the effort?

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    • Thanks for visiting and commenting. I only found out last year that they were sugar maples, although now I realize I could have tapped them even if they had been another variety – the sap would just not have been as sweet. It has been less work and more fun that I had thought, but then two trees is not such a big deal. Still, we have now made over 5 litres of excellent syrup, so definitely has been worth it.
      If you can’t eat nuts, you could possible do it with pumpkin seeds or some other kind of large seed. Or even mixed seeds would be tasty.

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      • That’s great to hear! I’m surprised that it hadn’t been too much work and you’ve yielded so much from just two trees! Although not too surprised about the work; it does sound pretty fun!

        Hilda thanks so much for the replacement suggestion; that’s so thoughtful! What a great idea🙂

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  40. You’re quite welcome. It is true that we should be thinking of alternatives because of food allergies, availability and different tastes . I have been using a lot more seeds lately. Recently I cooked an entire, enormous cinderella pumpkin and normally would throw away the seeds because they were cooked, but since they were easy to peel, I put them on a pizza. They are a great nut substitute.

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  41. These cookies look like they would be hard to eat just one! Checking out your blog, your recipes all look delicious and interesting Your DIY approach to your kitchen adventures really shines through.

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  42. I love the idea of making homemade maple syrup! Your sandwich cookies look lke a dream, too. Yum!

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  43. Walnut marzipan!! I’m going to try that very soon. Thanks for sharing.

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  44. Hilda, these look amazing! I’m so impressed with this recipe!

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  45. You make your own maple syrup!! I am in awe! These sound amazing!

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  46. I love the sound of the cookies! And I will make the marzipan, I have never done it and you make it sound so easy!🙂 I might have to try this weekend!

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  47. The cookies look delicious- love maple and walnuts!

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  48. Pingback: Easter Stollen and Maple Hemp Marzipan | Along the Grapevine

  49. These cookies with Yummy filling look insanely delicious! Yum!,

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