Along the Grapevine

Japanese Quince Jelly and Chutney

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chaenomeles Wikipedia

I am well accustomed to cooking with quinces, but when we moved here it was difficult to find a source. So I decided to try some Japanese quinces (chaenomeles) from those ornamental shrubs which are quite common in local gardens. Although I don’t have any of my own, most people are only too  happy if you volunteer to remove them in October when they start littering the ground around them. So, thanks Connie for my supply this year.

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They are smaller than the tree variety (true quince or Cydonia oblonga), and have a large centre full of seeds resembling apple seeds. The taste is very lemony – more so than lemons. Wherever you store them will soon become permeated with the most heavenly scent, and they can be stored in a cool place for several weeks. They can be used pretty much in any regular quince recipe. For centuries they have been used in Asia for medicinal purposes, and recent studies confirm this. For more about the nutritional and medicinal value, check out this site.

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With my small stash I made a jelly and a chutney. There seems to be some doubt as to the value of the fruit as a jelly, but I suspect people who claim that have never actually tried it. I find the flavour delicious on its own, but if you want to experiment, a little orange or chilli or whatever you might add to apple would work well. Also, even though they are rock hard, preparing them was not a big chore.

Japanese Quince Jelly

Japanese quinces, quartered (no need to peel, discard seeds or membrane)

water

sugar

Place the cut quinces in a pan and barely cover with water.

Bring to a boil and simmer for about two hours. Mash lightly with a fork.

Strain the compote through a cheesecloth lined sieve and let sit overnight, or at least a few hours.

Pour the liquid into a pan and add the same volume of sugar.

Cook slowly (about 1 1/2 hours) until it is ready.

Skim off the frothy bits as it heats, and keep a close watch.

I usually overcook jelly, so I tested a small amount of liquid on a plate straight from the freezer. When it stays in one place you know it is ready.

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I am more a chutney than a jelly fan, so I used the remaining pound of quinces to make some. I never follow recipes for chutney. To me, chutney is a way to use up excess fruit, just mixed with vinegar, sugar and spices. It is pretty hard to go wrong. And you have one of the most useful staples in your fridge to show for it – as a condiment, in a cheese or grilled vegetable sandwich, mixed with yoghurt or mayonnaise for a dip, or just with crackers and cheese.

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Japanese Quince Chutney

1 lb quince, seeded and chopped.

3/4 lb onions, finely chopped

1/2 lb brown sugar

1 cup cider vinegar

some raisins (optional)

chilli peppers, or chilli flakes to taste.

Place all ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer until thick (about 2 hours on a low heat).

I used two whole cayenne peppers, with seeds, chopped very finely. But the variety and amount are your call.

Author: Hilda

I am a backyard forager who likes to share recipes using the wild edibles of our area.

10 thoughts on “Japanese Quince Jelly and Chutney

  1. I really need to find quince! I’ve had quince jelly once, and liked it enough, but I just love the smell of the fruit! A few rare times I was able to get hold of them, I put a couple in my car to perfume it! Mmm, like you said, heavenly! 🙂

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  2. Pingback: Nigella’s Quince Brandy | JJASON What's in Season

  3. Looks delicious, thanks for sharing. About the quince, I suggest you tor try the “quince paste”, it’s a long process but so yummy. Have a nice week-end 🙂

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    • Thanks for the comment. Yes, I do like quince paste, but would have needed a lot more quinces than what I had. Also, I still have a lot of crab apple paste which was based on the quince idea. Maybe next year.

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  4. would love to try the chutney

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  5. Will definitely be trying the chutney when I get my next batch of quinces next fall 🙂 Thanks for sharing!

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  6. Pingback: Quince Wince | rambling ratz

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  8. Pingback: Japanese Quince Paste | Along the Grapevine

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