Along the Grapevine

Sumac Rice Pudding

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100_0831When in New York last week, I had to visit the famous Rice to Riches in Lower Manhattan. Their website is under construction, but you can find a list of their rice pudding flavours for delivery, and will give you an idea of how this little shop gives this lowly dessert a whole new makeover. Something like an ice cream parlour, and just as busy, they serve puddings of every imaginable flavour with catchy names, like Almond Shmalmond, Take me to Tiramisu, and Fluent in French Toast. And toppings!

When I first heard about it last year, I decided to try my own hand at making rice puddings of an unconventional sort. As a base I used 1 cup arborio rice, 2 cups water, and 1 cup coconut milk. To that I added flavourings, such as rose or orange blossom water, or lavender. But vanilla, nuts, fruit or whatever would work just as well. I combined all these ingredients, added a little sweetener (I usually used coconut sugar).

But this is a blog about wild foods, so I can’t try and recreate even their Secret Life of Pumpkin for this space. However, I can share with you my recipe for sumac rice pudding, which by the way cannot be found at this NYC restaurant. I’m sure there are many other wild edibles which would make interesting puddings, but one at a time.

I used sumac molasses for this, so there was no need to add any sugar. However, you could probably use powder or sumac tea and add sugar as necessary.

Suma Rice Pudding recipe100_0830

1 cup short-grained rice

1 cup water

1 cup sumac molasses

1 tin coconut milk

toasted nuts (optional)

Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan and cook covered, stirring occasionally, over medium heat for about 1/2 hour, or just until the rice is thoroughly cooked. The pudding will set as it cools, so don’t worry about it being too saucy. And feel free to be creative with your own toppings, although I personally prefer it just with a few toasted nuts and some sumac powder.

Author: Hilda

I am a backyard forager who likes to share recipes using the wild edibles of our area.

3 thoughts on “Sumac Rice Pudding

  1. Looks yummy. I recently read a recipe in “Canadian Living” that asked for Sumac; first time I saw this ingredient in a regular publication. Could be I am just behind the times.

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    • Actually, it is yummy. And no, you are not behind the times as most people don’t seem to be aware of it, although I think that might change quickly. I found it a few years ago in the Indian spice shop in Kensington, and find it really useful. It also made me wonder what was the difference between it and the sumac we have. I assumed if we were importing it, it must be another food entirely, but no, we just don’t see our own as anything worthwhile. Even now, you cannot buy local sumac anywhere, and health food stores are having to import it.

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  2. Pingback: Sumac and Rhubarb Soup | Along the Grapevine

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